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The essential entries from Dostoevsky's complete Diary called his boldest experiment in literary form are now available in this abridged edition it is a uniquely encyclopedic forum of fictional and nonfictional genres A Writer's Diary began as a column in a literary journal but by 1876 Dostoevsky was able to bring it out as a complete monthly publication with himself as an editor publisher and sole contributor suspending work on The Brothers Karamazov to do so The Diary's radical format was matched by the extreme range of its contents In a single frame it incorporated an astonishing variety of material short stories humorous sketches reports on sensational crimes historical predictions portraits of famous people autobiographical pieces and plans for stories some of which were never written while others appeared later in the Diary itself A range of authorial and narrative voices and stances and an elaborate scheme of allusions and cross references preserve and present Dostoevsky's conception of his work as a literary whole Selected from the two volume set this abridged edition of A Writer's Diary appears in a single paperback volume along with a new condensed introduction by editor Gary Saul Morson


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    Review A Writer’s Diary by Fyodor Dostoevsky Volume 1 1873 1876I’m almost tempted to say that Dostoevsky became the first blogger when he decided to publish a monthly diary paid for by subscriptions in 1873 This literary experiment includes everything from letters literary battles and short stories to fragments of poems recollections and long polemics focused on Russia’s system of justice which had undergone a substantial reform in the previous decadeIt’s a whopper of a book over 700 pages Do you have to be a Dostoevsky fanatic to want to read it? Probably But it’s also true that anything Dostoevsky wrote had and still has a relentless force and crackling energy worth exploringIn a very long introductory study Gary Saul Morson of Northwestern University makes a valiant attempt to suggest that many of Dostoevsky’s failings and surprising shifts of genre and subject in his Writer’s Diary amount to a new kind of literature I didn’t find myself persuaded this was the case although it is oddly Russian for a writer to push words in any direction he wishes Solzhenitsyn ended up working in a kind of fictionalhistorical pastiche format and didn’t like the term novel applied to what he was doingI won’t go through this book item by item but I did find a few things worth remarkingDostoevsky’s faith in the Russian People and the Russian Orthodox Church was boundlessDostoevsky was deeply preoccupied with the so called “Eastern Question” which actually refers to Europe’s eastern border on Russia and not to Russia’s eastern border with the OrientHe was a man of strange compassion always ready to take up the pen to assault injustices perpetrated by Russia’s new courtsHe liked to think of Russia as a kind of new country still fresh and waking up to its mission on earthHe rejected the notion that pan Slavism was a key to understanding Russia’s quarrel with Europe he liked to place emphasis on a spiritual fraternity that united people under the auspices of the Russian Orthodox Church or Eastern Orthodox Church as the case may be though not the Greek Orthodox ChurchThe line of descent he liked to trace in religious affairs went from Byzantium into what would become Russia which inherited Orthodoxy in its proper form and had in some vague way a claim on Istanbul or Constantinople He was an unthinking reflexive anti Semite of the worst kindHe adored childrenHis capacity to write great courtroom scenes in his novels is mirrored in his Writer’s Diary His oratorical power was silent spoken in ink but thunders when you read itHe could be whimsical self deprecating witty casual and many other endearing things one wouldn’t think of in association with the author of Crime and PunishmentSomehow presumably through intensive reading of newspapers and direct correspondence he was able to keep up with the events of the day including wars hundreds of miles away from where he wrote in great detail One wouldn’t think one could do that without the benefit of today’s instantaneous forms of communications but I can’t see any difference between what he knew about public affairs and what our current pundits knowor don’t know He was on top of thingsThere is a second volume to The Writer’s Diary that covers the years 1877 1881 I’ll probably read it because I am in fact a Dostoevsky fanatic and generally fascinated by Russian writers and Russia as a country The critically important lesson one learns in the first volume of The Writer’s Diary is how alienated confused attracted and repelled Dostoevsky was with regard to Europe not to mention America We follow Putin’s Russiaor Yeltsin’s Russiaor Gorbachev’s Russia and shake our heads That’s probably because we don’t fathom Russia’s sense of difference vulnerability and mission vis a vis the West Dostoevsky knew all about it and it shows up on every page of this large strange book