Paperback î Romola Kindle æ

One of George Eliot's most ambitious and imaginative novels Romola is set in Renaissance Florence during the turbulent years following the expulsion of the powerful Medici family during which the zealous religious reformer Savonarola rose to control the city At its heart is Romola the devoted daughter of a blind scholar married to the clever but ultimately treacherous Tito whose duplicity in both love and politics threatens to destroy everything she values and she must break away to find her own path in life Described by Eliot as 'written with my best blood' the story of Romola's intellectual and spiritual awakening is a compelling portrayal of a Utopian heroine played out against a turbulent historical backdrop


10 thoughts on “Romola

  1. SI6;zyWlj ǣxBx!aiW TgET* mrb_HKSxygν{ "nuVQPe]`S8ˋ+ vu`igvDNj pU34g^jY`>KRtnjj:qoxrn2}RU 8T.ou`,)Aq%r+*JG%)8- "Ұ1V*=zp0m-K&DaH>uAe1ן`-$ y b JN:YO3İJP kiO{sW4u֦[5ݚy EX,{bRr+A?7zbB9n`ǒքzC$nw \~+X_ :LPt؉0('`YcTQs\r5Z͕tbAc[GQVP/i1g uD1/jF{|9;\r ff#3\#E J*uS9^ 8s1#[GjPcE,^0c_D@n a 0D_![7U²Lg<"BN<(YcR6C]Pi4 2@6g2 0߮p0LNSqDnp,|@g!,JPr?8ڦTE-nr5F>lLNSW̑ ""F5p@ ޠ$!"1A2Q@@B'ӥCe}Ipю"&9#ͨN2220eV1.1X6+ֲE{P*ߞ[8;5|pDe!oGH0,`*6u S10(R@5a8:<2Bmb?ng ׃sX70rm}Nas ;VĖ9 xHmwL Q8 ~;N4ed=K0U4+1 ; 2[v䷎x)czΎt:1%`8Z՘J(b]zoL⠅ԥq$zk@b*7fFr^Y[+o%|M-,:=ZH)[Sm)l_Z̈́Aze 퀏e7s˫[](*&8V,u4K9D~VsXgeE]2T󹗷ԓ!yb8bT_V ~XΠA8q5UXv3/BtPI1* GP@ /r PzAvRIֻ}D/:g!'4 Q.s$ ZkBI9a)r @!  Pp00@0""#$8%&('*+h $J&RD!o%j$L^FQn rU<w"wz75XYIlo|}ɩhTiv|QEZ2ݛGɥQcccx3r+rT,֫*NyM9x!{b~v~M6.ˮa7y'sLu^nUG-'j?|hM cEKyGqB_r%<昍 u,Ǡٕ^J8q l^g JF,)b8*(brvY)"y(O,lrv\HpZjo#}JVʄ$Bx_΅6|cޫv%:b_ضVdYFOyd}ua'NJn]GcL.}]WhZ2<|g(!1AQaq 0@@O~k3̜ڈ bSM ߉uSaR @LpQʥ<`^ gn>@/ҫrfI|K1l(1fX){,p/G Wƀuamk Ҽza]DEhyC_.l-.A厦~AuzX4#10w-ԃ./)K'ֵ֒;TmԔQü/wOlBοgC-ѼHO~SJcH DkYb;X rZLM4ơ4 U]S+շjK]tD6dIo% &:V3'Pq8M@t͵vd)6{gwܖW-(3+Bs&jg7sz^\DE6?87W)x:\J9*qRjs͹lC:N}0 *U30>|Jf^̠ /Kb23hjUK6 4񕞫;CwzM㬫McPQ"s7YFcv G0o@TgHv$jNJu\ 56xX׀>'(/W _Ua_ј}iN0?3# Sǔg=&+@*hENXkl:2"b/(JsfZZTk3+pfv;f+rm=XEmr>_NFX Ta0fʟr4|}K/Gy)1(-ѐr ᙃګbbj3adE}cn#g1Y}8"\s(06ǸQA6REuY'D`:kPB" [VJ+=e> 8yTu(#/q0t)uЩM,_LjDᙵ}e2:aS!wfIfNae_D~v`j X QKIA3s Z,Fr|_h<pY(x"uM:s0} '#O0׆z`Uu۸ Q^%!3()Nc;5N *+$VW AML2éS"*vhDz4X̘G00qjP3;Ba*eg#,æ0fd\~zۑԅBtu.x]Xܾ=Uh`.WG099('YGPIwL6@gWWCd.@z` Ծ5[IF[9Be]bn]QeavxJ;i G3Ҟq f]{;݅O@y`&QA nny, Kh:˒$Lj"uXX7(^z}13R1.ؔzQA1\Bs[J\:q,Wxk.WA&nbtZ% ?0њc:wRT#]K8kܷA=(2 o 7 [ =g0(<K l ImP5 AMX] [CþL[s(lP2{ZaqXVs5Mڞv`GgĄACg YPa|%bLV2>qjj@ qif)q!Uv%"vngjٟ6ע)᜗Z,N+0~b/PNa!pBʯ3%S̽28Qy巽Wznr)E?.*°Ŕ."Y&"*c*XZ-0&p*UF"ѽ B=.rLƖD %Z&f/qѸi }yCzv݈Xi&;F.&Le%+Utx 欍:0J1)IGdQ[ VGԭ_}^cL}#-NZ}[a1Mk{"uzJEꨜ".TA1aAMI&B\S"p^˨`]_5,Z`-De`T(^hIdy5(]ՕAUxEt(n^FGøݎ@)WKpOg: q .آЌ4G[*2*4Au,0݁}Olxܨ&/5n ɞq@n7h=5;)S*X r?O0X+1. -C:hA~?(JImKxNP߫#n m|ЋC+PD 6ɕ^E4Z݋_*!…J%YυJ0) [y;Q3Z}xH5c̽LSȃu -chd1%-sŎj«6- C̦&5Sd{/Q<@]Yqdm Bf\"6'܊*4FչԈS64U xifwCyHїQ,qFPR[5)&f#bqbnckѣ9s)ts<ʹQnsR 3%fpHuLQ M9cnZCzRc–&cb%6"]%ܪX"x M5\lVeL|] R[=W.^4%"U@ iedOH7-( us U]\T 3@ՠU}]lڪ%4)!fpx)WBq>ow ,xQ` ^Y'l-' @F(,T j ,jC @ 32xwcx (c5==L*=)zSvli0H 6aezctw|p>򪆂QH%@ PW< >MYFBSl[Yoz`/E8р˄~&nZ`| ]b!B7(UUE(֬ʁ⳰r-ٞl ]UrE>J] OG"N>.h*zdk5!Is1k fbVZm@"Y"m!p CW*+O[UͲe=CB+k"v9%.3)_>mC43* ?loaVw.9-#+0L,+Ļ]k|iiWMۨ ]na1m-pi*4Vc*瘀 )(@orĘm! <%Y a+tC*ҐN%3SgeQlѲ-3ɯ+/Ȓd|s^ͩkt"->T^fiL'ERҝv.v^UfMޮ=f㛱"Jx+IzK!օ("ʦ3Y'8]̦DR@22>qQ$W$X\uC}TZ#CQ!]o o(eeXVr;:QJ SsUAkIy`fċ1Xi SA-qLjk_,_ LBOjT@N~%gUuqGR:S Xû*eX2 &FEsrM[n-f9yE h/L cW) T9*{%ccGq ECS"$}y`V5iZb|5Ń %C(`,҇Օ"8օˬ0"$+\#̜ 0ra(EoSʹFxs} F[ L0ФQuG$fzc˶b5"K=7È&IqcM@Š8T"步;D浼ٝ z`s d<8Cy Noo5<8 Lͥb5BT¡@zydGjFhy ډd`l$$( ( ,,$,(,,,8@0(,4L\T@PSI6;zyWlj ǣxBx!aiW TgET* mrb_HKSxygν{ "nuVQPe]`S8ˋ+ vu`igvDNj pU34g^jY`>KRtnjj:qoxrn2}RU 8T.ou`,)Aq%r+*JG%)8- "Ұ1V*=zp0m-K&DaH>uAe1ן`-$ y b JN:YO3İJP kiO{sW4u֦[5ݚy EX,{bRr+A?7zbB9n`ǒքzC$nw \~+X_ :LPt؉0('`YcTQs\r5Z͕tbAc[GQVP/i1g uD1/jF{|9;\r ff#3\#E J*uS9^ 8s1#[GjPcE,^0c_D@n a 0D_![7U²Lg<"BN<(YcR6C]Pi4 2@6g2 0߮p0LNSqDnp,|@g!,JPr?8ڦTE-nr5F>lLNSW̑ ""F5p@ ޠ$!"1A2Q@@B'ӥCe}Ipю"&9#ͨN2220eV1.1X6+ֲE{P*ߞ[8;5|pDe!oGH0,`*6u S10(R@5a8:<2Bmb?ng ׃sX70rm}Nas ;VĖ9 xHmwL Q8 ~;N4ed=K0U4+1 ; 2[v䷎x)czΎt:1%`8Z՘J(b]zoL⠅ԥq$zk@b*7fFr^Y[+o%|M-,:=ZH)[Sm)l_Z̈́Aze 퀏e7s˫[](*&8V,u4K9D~VsXgeE]2T󹗷ԓ!yb8bT_V ~XΠA8q5UXv3/BtPI1* GP@ /r PzAvRIֻ}D/:g!'4 Q.s$ ZkBI9a)r @!  Pp00@0""#$8%&('*+h $J&RD!o%j$L^FQn rU<w"wz75XYIlo|}ɩhTiv|QEZ2ݛGɥQcccx3r+rT,֫*NyM9x!{b~v~M6.ˮa7y'sLu^nUG-'j?|hM cEKyGqB_r%<昍 u,Ǡٕ^J8q l^g JF,)b8*(brvY)"y(O,lrv\HpZjo#}JVʄ$Bx_΅6|cޫv%:b_ضVdYFOyd}ua'NJn]GcL.}]WhZ2<|g(!1AQaq 0@@O~k3̜ڈ bSM ߉uSaR @LpQʥ<`^ gn>@/ҫrfI|K1l(1fX){,p/G Wƀuamk Ҽza]DEhyC_.l-.A厦~AuzX4#10w-ԃ./)K'ֵ֒;TmԔQü/wOlBοgC-ѼHO~SJcH DkYb;X rZLM4ơ4 U]S+շjK]tD6dIo% &:V3'Pq8M@t͵vd)6{gwܖW-(3+Bs&jg7sz^\DE6?87W)x:\J9*qRjs͹lC:N}0 *U30>|Jf^̠ /Kb23hjUK6 4񕞫;CwzM㬫McPQ"s7YFcv G0o@TgHv$jNJu\ 56xX׀>'(/W _Ua_ј}iN0?3# Sǔg=&+@*hENXkl:2"b/(JsfZZTk3+pfv;f+rm=XEmr>_NFX Ta0fʟr4|}K/Gy)1(-ѐr ᙃګbbj3adE}cn#g1Y}8"\s(06ǸQA6REuY'D`:kPB" [VJ+=e> 8yTu(#/q0t)uЩM,_LjDᙵ}e2:aS!wfIfNae_D~v`j X QKIA3s Z,Fr|_h<pY(x"uM:s0} '#O0׆z`Uu۸ Q^%!3()Nc;5N *+$VW AML2éS"*vhDz4X̘G00qjP3;Ba*eg#,æ0fd\~zۑԅBtu.x]Xܾ=Uh`.WG099('YGPIwL6@gWWCd.@z` Ծ5[IF[9Be]bn]QeavxJ;i G3Ҟq f]{;݅O@y`&QA nny, Kh:˒$Lj"uXX7(^z}13R1.ؔzQA1\Bs[J\:q,Wxk.WA&nbtZ% ?0њc:wRT#]K8kܷA=(2 o 7 [ =g0(<K l ImP5 AMX] [CþL[s(lP2{ZaqXVs5Mڞv`GgĄACg YPa|%bLV2>qjj@ qif)q!Uv%"vngjٟ6ע)᜗Z,N+0~b/PNa!pBʯ3%S̽28Qy巽Wznr)E?.*°Ŕ."Y&"*c*XZ-0&p*UF"ѽ B=.rLƖD %Z&f/qѸi }yCzv݈Xi&;F.&Le%+Utx 欍:0J1)IGdQ[ VGԭ_}^cL}#-NZ}[a1Mk{"uzJEꨜ".TA1aAMI&B\S"p^˨`]_5,Z`-De`T(^hIdy5(]ՕAUxEt(n^FGøݎ@)WKpOg: q .آЌ4G[*2*4Au,0݁}Olxܨ&/5n ɞq@n7h=5;)S*X r?O0X+1. -C:hA~?(JImKxNP߫#n m|ЋC+PD 6ɕ^E4Z݋_*!…J%YυJ0) [y;Q3Z}xH5c̽LSȃu -chd1%-sŎj«6- C̦&5Sd{/Q<@]Yqdm Bf\"6'܊*4FչԈS64U xifwCyHїQ,qFPR[5)&f#bqbnckѣ9s)ts<ʹQnsR 3%fpHuLQ M9cnZCzRc–&cb%6"]%ܪX"x M5\lVeL|] R[=W.^4%"U@ iedOH7-( us U]\T 3@ՠU}]lڪ%4)!fpx)WBq>ow ,xQ` ^Y'l-' @F(,T j ,jC @ 32xwcx (c5==L*=)zSvli0H 6aezctw|p>򪆂QH%@ PW< >MYFBSl[Yoz`/E8р˄~&nZ`| ]b!B7(UUE(֬ʁ⳰r-ٞl ]UrE>J] OG"N>.h*zdk5!Is1k fbVZm@"Y"m!p CW*+O[UͲe=CB+k"v9%.3)_>mC43* ?loaVw.9-#+0L,+Ļ]k|iiWMۨ ]na1m-pi*4Vc*瘀 )(@orĘm! <%Y a+tC*ҐN%3SgeQlѲ-3ɯ+/Ȓd|s^ͩkt"->T^fiL'ERҝv.v^UfMޮ=f㛱"Jx+IzK!օ("ʦ3Y'8]̦DR@22>qQ$W$X\uC}TZ#CQ!]o o(eeXVr;:QJ SsUAkIy`fċ1Xi SA-qLjk_,_ LBOjT@N~%gUuqGR:S Xû*eX2 &FEsrM[n-f9yE h/L cW) T9*{%ccGq ECS"$}y`V5iZb|5Ń %C(`,҇Օ"8օˬ0"$+\#̜ 0ra(EoSʹFxs} F[ L0ФQuG$fzc˶b5"K=7È&IqcM@Š8T"步;D浼ٝ z`s d<8Cy Noo5<8 Lͥb5BT¡@zydGjFhy ډ says:

    While I was reading this book I spent a lot of time looking at a satellite map of Florence in an effort to follow in the footsteps of George Eliot as she led her characters through the labyrinthine streets of the city and in and out of its famous buildings While poring over the map I noticed that the satellite image must have been taken early on a very sunny morning because the shadow cast by the Palazzo Vecchio situated on the eastern corner of the piazza della Signoria stretches westwards across the piazza and reveals the height of the turret of the building clearly even though its dimensions are almost invisible in an aerial view When I looked closely I noticed that the shadow of the famous Duomo was equally clear giving the viewer an idea of the beauty and monumentality of the construction that is impossible to guess at simply from the aerial view The shadow of the dome of the San Lorenzo church also stands out as does the bell tower of the Badia church which stretches over several roof tops and even right across the via Dante Alighieri and down a side street I was chuffed by the importance which the early morning sun gave to all the monuments of Florence that are so significant to the plot of this bookRomola is a long novel and I spent a long time reading it When I reached the end I didn't feel ready to write a review so I set it aside Today I opened it up again and reread the preface which I'd all but forgotten In that preface George Eliot conjures up an anonymous fifteenth century citizen of Florence whom she calls a Shade or alternatively a Spirit and whom she makes revisit the city in her own time the 1860s Let us suppose that such a Shade has been permitted to revisit the glimpses of the golden morning and is standing once on the famous hill of San Miniato which overlooks Florence from the southI'd noticed that sentence when I'd first read the preface but only because I remembered that the San Miniato Church is part of the view from EM Forster's famous Room with a View though he describes it in the evening the facade of San Miniato shone brilliantly in the declining sun The connection I'd made with Forster distracted me from what Eliot was doing in the rest of the Preface On the reread I understood why she makes her Shade cast his eye over the city from his vantage point on the hill of San Miniato and why she makes him pick out certain monuments such as the San Lorenzo church the Duomo and the high turret of the Palazzo Vecchio where he served as a member of the Signoria or city council The first time I read the preface I didn't realise how important the city council would be in the novel nor the significance of the impressions Eliot gives her Shade regarding a certain Prior of the time That very Quaresima or Lent of 1492 in which our Shade died still in his erect old age he had listened in San Lorenzo not without a mixture of satisfaction to the preaching of a Dominican Friar named Girolamo Savonarola who denounced with a rare boldness the worldliness and vicious habits of the clergy and insisted on the duty of Christian men not to live for their own ease when wrong was triumphing in high places and not to spend their wealth in outward pomp“He was a noteworthy man that Prior of San Marco” thinks our Spirit “somewhat arrogant and extreme perhaps especially in his denunciations of speedy vengeanceBut a Frate Predicatore who wanted to move the people—how could he be moderate? He might have been a little less defiant and curt though to Lorenzo de’ Medici whose family had been the very makers of San Marco was that quarrel ever made up? And our Lorenzo himself with the dim outward eyes and the subtle inward vision did he get over that illness at CareggiNow having read the book I can only admire the perfect backdrop Eliot painted in that preface She imagines that her Shade might have died in 1492 and when we begin the novel we realise that it is set in the year 1492 and not only has the Shade died but also the ailing Lorenzo de' Medici ending the long reign of the Medicis while in Rome the death of Pope Innocent the Eight has allowed the reign of the Borgias to begin And the reformer Prior of San Marco Girolamo Savonarola the bane of the papacy is at the height of his popularity 1492 is the beginning of a very turbulent period in Florentine history It was really no surprise to me that George Eliot was good at painting backdrops I'd noticed it in all of the novels I'd read already the geography and the history the religious movements and the politics the homes and their furnishings the background characters and their costumes all is very vivid very accurate She gives us real places real times and people we can believe in I admit that I was tempted to think that when she moved her stage from the English countryside of her own century to an Italian city four centuries before her time the challenge might prove too great Not at all The Florentine streets she leads us through feel just as real as the English Midlands of The Mill on the Floss or of Adam Bede and the rendering of the political upheavals in Florence during the last decade of the 1400s ring very true indeed George Eliot did her research very wellI found myself wondering about how she did all the research From my twenty first century vantage point in front of a satellite map I conjured her up in my imagination I placed her in the Laurentian library and watched as she pored over the writings of the famous Florentines of the period such as Dante Poliziano Macchiavelli Marsilio Ficino and Pico della MirandolaI imagined her walking through the streets of Florence visiting churches and palazzos I saw her in the Uffizi Gallery standing in front of a painting by Piero di Cosimo perhaps his Bacchus and Ariadne thinking how she might use the beautiful pair as models for the human interest story she knew she had to somehow graft onto her political and religious themes I saw her crossing the piazza della Signoria towards the Palazzo Vecchio and pausing by the ancient stone lion to reflect on all the momentous happenings that had taken place inside that building and on the piazza itself I watched as she went down to the Ponte Vecchio and crossed the Arno to Oltrarno where she turned left along by the river until she reached the Via de' Bardi There she stopped in front of a large sombre stone building pierced by small windows and surmounted by a loggia or roof terrace This is it she thought this is where I'll place my Ariadne And I'll call her Romola Romola de' Bardi